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Neovenator salerii by Kana-hebi Neovenator salerii by Kana-hebi
The type genus of the family Neovenatoridae. Neovenator salerii prowling. I decided to add some bright coloration and pattern that might have been more intense during the breeding season, as it occur in many birds and squamates today.
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:iconatlantis536:
Atlantis536 Featured By Owner Jun 17, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
You forgot the Panthera-like feathers.
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:icontkwth:
TKWTH Featured By Owner Mar 15, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Re: no coelurosaur, no feathers

Kulindadromeus says hi.
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:iconmutantninja0:
mutantninja0 Featured By Owner Mar 14, 2017  Student Traditional Artist
The mating display seems quite interesting. The reds and the blues, along with the purples and pinks are all wonderful choices but I can't help but feel there is a certain lack of harmony between them. The rest of the scheme is VERY lovely. The osteoderms seem to produce a sort of dissonance: they seem a bit too large or the contrast of colors makes them seem too large.


In other news, anybody notice how if a dinosaur is feathered then everyone will have little to no complaint about it's appearance? I'm starting to think a large section of the paleoart community hates the existence of reptiles.
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:iconethantavitas:
EthanTavitas Featured By Owner Aug 20, 2016  Student Artist
That's more like it, no feathers.
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:iconshadowoftheeast:
ShadowoftheEast Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Well, it's not unlikely they could have had feathers though.
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:iconursumeles:
Ursumeles Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2016
Awesome!
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:iconkana-hebi:
Kana-hebi Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2016  Professional General Artist
Thanks!
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:iconasari13:
asari13 Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
nice art
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:iconkana-hebi:
Kana-hebi Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2016  Professional General Artist
Thank you
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:iconxstreamchaosofficial:
XStreamChaosOfficial Featured By Owner Aug 11, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Wow! This looks beast!
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:iconkana-hebi:
Kana-hebi Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2016  Professional General Artist
Thanks a lot
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:iconpcawesomeness:
PCAwesomeness Featured By Owner Aug 10, 2016
Nice!

I think this thing would have only had lizard-like scales covering its body (and if you're liberal, some quills running down its back would fit), without any crocodilian osteoderms.

Otherwise, nice!
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:iconxiphactinus:
Xiphactinus Featured By Owner Aug 9, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Great job! I just had to write a comment to this masterpiece. In my opinion, this is one of the best reconstructions of Neovenator. Such a nice and realistic colors! Covers also very good. I think ever draw it, adding a bit of feathers. But this version is also possible. While no prints of Neovenator's skin, we can only guess.
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:iconkana-hebi:
Kana-hebi Featured By Owner Aug 10, 2016  Professional General Artist
Thank you! I don't want to add any feathers to any non-coelurosaur theropods until we find more determinant evidence. The case for Concavenator quills is very unlikely and the filaments present in some ornithiscian dinosaurs may not be homologous with feathers present in coelurosaurs. So, I prefer to leave them scaly until evidence shows me otherwise. As we have no prints of the scales, I was able to play around with them.
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:iconpaleosir:
paleosir Featured By Owner Aug 16, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Wasn't it so that in the last SVP I heard that the quill knobs of C.corcovatus were indeed again confirmed as real quill knobs (it had been contested before that, but it seems muscle scarring is unlikely, so yes, quills for conca. yay.
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:iconacepredator:
acepredator Featured By Owner Aug 9, 2016
Please get rid of the scales and replace them with feathers
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:iconspinoinwonderland:
ROFL are you high on feathers or something?

Neovenator isn't a coelurosaur.
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:iconpcawesomeness:
PCAwesomeness Featured By Owner Aug 10, 2016
Ahem...

dml.cmnh.org/2004Aug/msg00136.…

That being said, I don't think this thing would have had osteoderms either. Concavenator-like quills are OK, though.
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:iconwaldbeere7:
Waldbeere7 Featured By Owner Edited Aug 23, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
A 30cm² doesn't prove it's entirely scaly. And if it's true that dinosauria as a clade was lukewarm- instead of warm-blooded, most theropods would have needed fuzz to stay active, which Allosaurus would have defintely been atleast for a major part of it's life.
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:iconpcawesomeness:
PCAwesomeness Featured By Owner Aug 23, 2016
I doubt it was advanced enough to have ostrich-like feathers.
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:iconwaldbeere7:
Waldbeere7 Featured By Owner Aug 23, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Even more primitve feathers are better for insulation than scales. There's a reason why "reptiles" don't live in cold areas.
Also advanced isn't a term that makes sense when talking about animals. One animal isn't better than another.
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:iconpcawesomeness:
PCAwesomeness Featured By Owner Aug 23, 2016
I see.

However, Allosaurus lived in a desert, as opposed to Tyrannosaurus, which lived in a forest/swamp as warm as modern day Michigan.
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:iconwaldbeere7:
Waldbeere7 Featured By Owner Aug 23, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Allosaurus didn't just live in a desert. We have Allosaurus specimens from many different countries. Feathers on carnosaurs are up for the artist to decide on atm but Carnotaurus is the only solid evidence for scales and even it could have been partially feathered.
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:iconpcawesomeness:
PCAwesomeness Featured By Owner Aug 23, 2016
Mmmhmmm.

"Carnotaurus is the only solid evidence for scales and even it could have been partially feathered."

I think I hear Trey talking through you...
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(1 Reply)
:iconsekley:
Sekley Featured By Owner Aug 10, 2016
Even I personally am a bit tentative about putting feathers on non-coelurosaurs. The most I put on carnosaurs is a thin layer of fuzz similar to elephant hair.
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:iconxiphactinus:
Xiphactinus Featured By Owner Aug 9, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
It is not necessary so confidently to declare that he had feathers. No one knows what it was covered.
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:iconspinosaurus1:
spinosaurus1 Featured By Owner Aug 9, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
he really doesn't have to do that.
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:iconkana-hebi:
Kana-hebi Featured By Owner Aug 9, 2016  Professional General Artist
I prefer for more evidence to appear before I put filaments on non coelurosaur theropods.
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:iconacepredator:
acepredator Featured By Owner Aug 10, 2016
Phylogenetic bracketing plus the fact the knobs on Concavenator have been confirmed as quill knobs (and not muscle attachments) should be evidence.

We have less evidence of Smilodon having fir than of Neovenator or any theropod having feathers on at least part of the body.
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:iconplastospleen:
PLASTOSPLEEN Featured By Owner Aug 9, 2016
Damn! I absolutely love the scale pattern in this!
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:iconkana-hebi:
Kana-hebi Featured By Owner Aug 9, 2016  Professional General Artist
Thank you!
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:iconcoadykate:
coadykate Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Nice!
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:iconkana-hebi:
Kana-hebi Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2016  Professional General Artist
Thank you!
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:iconunclebourbons:
UncleBourbons Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2016
Wowza, I can practically see it moving and alive with this coloration. Great job
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:iconkana-hebi:
Kana-hebi Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2016  Professional General Artist
Thanks a lot!
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:icondontknowwhattodraw94:
Dontknowwhattodraw94 Featured By Owner Edited Aug 8, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Definitely different than how it's usually depicted. Also nice to see a bird tongue popping out of a non-avian theropod :)
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:iconkana-hebi:
Kana-hebi Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2016  Professional General Artist
Well we have 0 idea what their tongues were like.. for all we know avian-like tongues appeared much earlier than in avian dinosaurs.
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:iconvanillapokie:
vanillapokie Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2016  Student General Artist
Cool~
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:iconkana-hebi:
Kana-hebi Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2016  Professional General Artist
Thank you!
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:iconqueenserenity2012:
QueenSerenity2012 Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2016
Although I prefer them feathery, this is quite possibly the best reconstruction of Neovenator I've yet seen. If you show them as being scaly you ought to do something interesting with the scales and you certainly did! I'm terribly bored with the uniform pebbly scale look most artists give to their scaly dinosaurs. 
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:iconkana-hebi:
Kana-hebi Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2016  Professional General Artist
Thank you! yeah, i certainly agree there was possibly a lot more going on than just pebbly scales. I did not add feathers to neovenatorids since there is no evidence for fetahering in Allosauroid dinosaurs. 
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:iconplastospleen:
PLASTOSPLEEN Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2016
Except for the possible feathers in Concavenator
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:iconkana-hebi:
Kana-hebi Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2016  Professional General Artist
Yeah that has become a very unlikely theory... Concavenator more than likely did not have quills poking out of its arms.
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:iconacepredator:
acepredator Featured By Owner Aug 9, 2016
Except the "muscle attachment" theory went kaput last year
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:iconkana-hebi:
Kana-hebi Featured By Owner Aug 9, 2016  Professional General Artist
It is possible that the forearm in Concavenator is dislocated and the bumps are actually on the anterior ulnar surface. See Cau's argument theropoda.blogspot.co.uk/2016/…
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:iconplastospleen:
PLASTOSPLEEN Featured By Owner Aug 9, 2016
That's why I stressed the possible, and after reading MattMart's blog post on dromaeosaurid feathers, it seems unlikely to me as well. But there is Kulindadromeus showing that all dinosaur clades have the possibility of feathers.
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:iconqueenserenity2012:
I wouldn't be so sure, there was a paper released last year that defended the quill interpretation and I've yet to see a rebuttal of any sort. I haven't looked into it enough to say confidently either way, admittedly, but it seems to me that the no-feathers side of the debate has yet to respond.

I'd argue that the phylogenetic bracket implies feathers for allosauroids, but we also know that plenty of taxa redeveloped scales or (less parsimonious in my opinion) never had feathers in the first place. I'm comfortable with either interpretation, I just prefer feathers as the default integument. Truth be told, I actually suspect that dinosaurs were highly variable all across the board. Any possible combination of scales, bare skin, feathers could exist on one species (say T.rex for example) and a close relative (let's go with T. bataar) might have something radically different. Such variety amongst closely related species certainly isn't unheard of today. Especially since it seems to me that producing filamentous integument or feather-derived scales (and bare skin for that matter) is a fairly easy evolutionary development for dinosaurs. Look no further than modern birds, different closely related species have a huge diversity of feather, scale, and skin distribution! Non-avian dinosaurs were more ecologically and morphologically diverse so we should expect an even greater variety of different integumentary patterns. 
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:iconpaleojoe:
PaleoJoe Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2016  Student Traditional Artist
This is possibly the coolest color combination on Neovenator I have seen. Not to mention it's accuracy.
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:iconkana-hebi:
Kana-hebi Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2016  Professional General Artist
Thank you very much! I try to imagine colorations and overall general appearance that would be plausible for the paleoecology and phyologeny of each dinosaur i reconstruct. 
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:iconpaleojoe:
PaleoJoe Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2016  Student Traditional Artist
You're welcome.
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